898. Joseph Green

Joseph Green

B 1656  |  Stamford, CT, USA

D 15 July 1710  |  Stamford, CT, USA

M abt 1680  |  Stamford, CT, USA



Green, Joseph, late of Stamford, died July 15, 1710, and on Sept. 30, 1710, letters of administration on his estate granted to his widow Elizabeth Green and brother Benjamin Green, page 184. Inventory taken July 15, 1710, by Elisha Holly and Benjamin Green, and filed Sept. 30, 1710, page 184. Dec. 6, 1710, account filed and estate ordered distributed by Elisha Holly, Stephen Bishop, and Abraham Bell to his widow and children, three sons and four daughters, no names, page 184. Jan. 3, 1710/11, John and Mercy, children of decedent, made choice of their uncle Benjamin Green to be their guardian, and the court appointed Elizabeth Green, widow of decedent, guardian of Nathaniel, another son of decedent, page 391. F1-171

Green, Joseph, late of Stamford, Nov. 1, 1721, his widow, Elizabeth Green, administratrix, being now deceased, letters of administration de bonus non granted to his son Nathaniel Green, page 107. F1-256


Photographs


Documents

New England Families Genealogical and_Memorial  New England Families Genealogical and Memorial

A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of Commonwealths and the Founding of a Nation. References to the Green line.

Bishop Barbour Index  Bishop Barbour Index

This text file contains the births, marriages, and deaths of Bishops in Stamford between 1641 and 1853. The Barbour Index entries are alphabetized by first name. Daughter, Waitstill Green listed.

Stamford Family Registrations  Stamford Family Registrations

This text file contains the births, marriages, and deaths of Bishops in Stamford between 1641 and 1797. The entries in Huntington's Registration are listed in chronological orderby individual family unit.

Family History from an Early Date by Lewis Conley Bishop  Family History from an Early Date by Lewis Conley Bishop

A chronical of the Bishop Family penned by Lewis Conley Bishop

Descendants of John Byyshop  Descendants of John Byyshop

A comprehensive listing including details.

Genealogical and Family History of the State of Connecticut  Genealogical and Family History of the State of Connecticut

A Record of the Achievements of her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Founding of a Nation. Including details of the Bishops in Stamford.

A History of Stamford Connecticut  History of Stamford, Connecticut

A Record of the Achievements of her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Founding of a Nation. Including details of the Bishops and Greens in Stamford.

In 1734, forty-six planters on the west side of the Norwalk river petition for a new society. The next notice taken of this project, as far as records show, was simultaneously in Stamford and at the May session of the legislature, in 1736. Sixty-nine petitions, representing eighty families, and a list of L5,580, made a formal request to be incorporated as an ecclesiastical society by themselves. The petition was negatived, only to be renewed in October of the same year, by fifty-six men. The urgency of the petitioners led to the appointment of a special committee to examine their claims. In May 1737 the committee report favorably, assigning as proper boundaries of the society the Five Mile river on the east, and the Noroton on the west...On the west side of the parish, to separate it from the older society of Stamford, they define, as the western-most limits of Middlesex, "an old chimney about two and a half miles east of the Stamford meeting house," and "so to run a strait line midway between Stephen Bishop's house and David Dribble's house," and thence to where the Noroton crosses the Canaan line.
Sept. 19 - Committee for the safety for the town, appointed agreeably to recommendations of the continental congress, Col. Davenport, Esq., Benj. Weed, Esq., Amos Weed, Charles Weed, Israel Weed, Nathan Lounsberry, Thadeus Bell, Stephen Bishop, Deodate Davenport, Charles Smith and James Young. Witness: Sam. Jarvis, clerk.

A Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut; with the time of their arrival in the Country and Colony, their standing in society, place of residence, condition in life, where from, business, etc.  A Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut

A Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut; with the time of their arrival in the Country and Colony, their standing in society, place of residence, condition in life, where from, business, etc. Many Bishops listed starting page 241 (p 232 in document).

Notes

History of Stamford, Connecticut

In the History of Stamford, Connecticut by Elijah Baldwin Huntington, this entry for the Green family is found:

Green, John, lost his wife, Mary, here in 1657. He was declared freeman of the Connecticut Colony in 1662, and represented the town in 1669. Joseph Green mortgaged lands here in 1651, to Thomas Morehouse; and William Green appears on the records as landholder in 1650. His land was next to Daniel Scofield.

Green, Mary, wife of John, d. 14, 9, 1657.

Green, John and Martha Finch, m. - 7, 1658

For "pounders," that is, for those authorized to impound lawless cattle, there were: Thomas Slason and Samuel Finch for Northfield; Daniel Lockwood, for the Southfield; John Green and John Bishop, for Eastfield; and Clement Buxton for Rockyneck.

"the town doth give unto John Green two house lots for his sons, next to Abraham Ambler's front, which homelots were given as they were soldiers."


"In March 1672, Francis Bell, Francis Brown, and John Green were appointed a committee to treat with the 'Engins,' and understand what they have to say to the town, and to make return of what they have to say to the town, that the said Indians may receive an answer from the town."

What report this committee made is not to be found on record. That it did not allay the fears which had been excited, the following records of a later date will show. The first of these is found in a letter, dated Stamford, Dec. 29, 1673, and directed to the General Court at Boston. It was intended as an earnest plea for help:

"Wherefore, in expectation of the armies coming against this open declared enemy we have been hitherto silent, but by the long retard and no intelligence upon any prosecution upon that account we are afraid (it) is laid aside, whereby we shall be much endangered if not ruined, if your honors do not by some speedy means relieve us, for we are frontiers and most likely assaulted in the first place."

The above plea for help seems to have been made jointly by Stamford, Greenwich and Rye. Again, on the tenth of October, 1675, governor Andros sends word to the governor at Hartford that five or six thousand Indians are in league and ready to fall upon Greenwich, Hartford and other places still further east at the next full moon.

On the nineteenth of the same month he sends word that it is rumored that the Stamford Indians are in arms; and he commends the colonists in the state for putting themselves "in a fitting posture for all events." What this means we may learn from our records, which show that in March 1675 '6, Mr. Bell, sen., John Green, Peter Ferris, John Bates and Daniel Weed were chosen to attend to the work of fortification, according to the order of the council; and another vote requires that the stockading of the town shall be fully finished.

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