3587. Mary UNK

Mary UNK

B abt 1603  |  England

D 27 May 1646  |  At Sea

M 1625  |  England



Mary UNK was the first wife of Stephen Goodyear. Stephen Goodyear was one of the company of Davenport and Eaton which landed in Boston 28 June 1637, proceeded to New Haven in 1638, and there instituted their theocratic government. He was from the start prominent and engaged in foreign trade sometimes by himself, sometimes in company with Eaton and others. The most famous incident in his business career was his connection with the ill-fated phantom ship celebrated by Cotton Mather and much later by Longfellow. A chief purpose in the expedition was the securing a charter and perhaps it was in some connection with this that Mrs. Goodyear was on the vessel. The ship, of dubious seaworthiness, left port to never be seen again. A phantom apparition of the ship was seen by the residents much later, made famous by Longfellow.

Photographs


Documents

1641 New Haven, CT. Map
Map

1641 Map of New Haven, CT

Showing property of Stephen Goodyear

Added by Michael D. Ketchum 12 September 2014
New Haven, CT Freemen
Document

New Haven Freemen Signature

Including signature of Stephen Goodyear

Added by Michael D. Ketchum 12 September 2014
Genealogy of the Goodyear Family  The Genealogy of the Goodyear Family

Written by Grace Goodyear Kirkman, a detailed accounting of the Goodyear family.

Goodyear Family History  Goodyear Family Tree

A Goodyear Family Tree with sources.

The Descendants of John Byyshop  The Descendants of John Byyshop

A comprehensive list of the descendants of John Byyshop

Stamford Maps 1641-1783  Stamford Maps 1641-1783

Stanford Maps

Bishop Barbour Index  Bishop Barbour Index

This text file contains the births, marriages, and deaths of Bishops in Stamford between 1641 and 1853. The Barbour Index entries are alphabetized by first name.

Stamford Family Registrations  Stamford Family Registrations

This text file contains the births, marriages, and deaths of Bishops in Stamford between 1641 and 1797. The entries in Huntington's Registration are listed in chronological orderby individual family unit.

Descendants of John Byyshop  Descendants of John Byyshop

A comprehensive listing including details.

Genealogical and Family History of the State of Connecticut  Genealogical and Family History of the State of Connecticut

A Record of the Achievements of her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Founding of a Nation. Including details of the Bishops in Stamford.

A History of Stamford Connecticut  History of Stamford, Connecticut

A Record of the Achievements of her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Founding of a Nation. Including details of the Bishops in Stamford.

Norwalk by Rev. Charles M. Selleck, A.M.  Norwalk by Rev. Charles M. Selleck, A.M.

A book to bring the ancient town's recondite history to light, preserving and perpetuating its mentions and memories. Inluding some Bishop references.

A Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut; with the time of their arrival in the Country and Colony, their standing in society, place of residence, condition in life, where from, business, etc.  A Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut

A Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut; with the time of their arrival in the Country and Colony, their standing in society, place of residence, condition in life, where from, business, etc. Many Bishops listed starting page 241 (p 232 in document).

The Elizabeth Clauson Witchcraft Trial  Elizabeth Clauson Witchcraft Trial

An Account of the Trial in 1692 of a Woman from Stamford, Connecticut Who Was Accused of Being a Witch by Ronald Marcus. Unlike the more famous Salem Witch Trials, the Stamford cases ended in acquittal. Some involvement from the Rev. John Bishop and Stephen Bishop, Sr.

Notes

Stephen Goodyear, Husband

The first positive knowledge we have of Stephen Goodyear is when his name appears as the forty-second in order in the original list of all the Freemen of New Haven, prepared in 1638. He was also accorded his proportion of land as soon as the town site was laid out. Of his first wife, Mary, tradition says she was a woman of large estates in London, possessing property now famous as Grosvenor Square and surroundings. In 1646, she set out to return to England to visit family and the ship was never heard from again.

In 1648, Deputy Governor Stephen Goodyear married Margaret Lamberton. born 1614. widow of Captain Geo. Lamberton, who was also lost on the ship. Deputy Governor Goodyear went to England in 1658, and died there that year. The news of his death had been received by fall, and his estate was inventoried, Oct. 15, 1658. This inventory is recorded in the New Haven Probate Records, Book I, part I, pages 78 and 79, and is headed, " An inventory of the estate of the Right Worshipful Stephen Goodyear, Esquire, the late Deputie Gouvernour of this Colony." After a long list of household furniture and personal effects, the list of the real estate is given, and after cattle, horses, and other stock are the following items, showing the semi-slavery of the day: "1 man servant, 5 yrs. yet to serve," " 2 boys about 11 yrs., yet to serve." The total value of the estate was i.'804, 19s. lOd. " besides interest in the Iron works, and property at Barbadoes and elsewhere, not known how much, yet to be appraised." This other property must have added materially to the estate, for although in the final settlement there were debts against the estate of £2,403, Mrs. Goodyear received over £300 upon the distribution of the estate.


The Ghost Ship of New Haven Sets Sail Shrouded in Mystery (excerpt)
by Michael Hoberman

English settlers in New Haven Colony witnessed one of the strangest apparitions in the history of New England, and the retelling of this spectral event has gone down in folk tradition as the Ghost or Phantom Ship of New Haven. Several versions of the story were recorded in print, including one recorded by Reverend Cotton Mather in his 1702 book Magnalia Christi Americana, a history of the religious development of early New England.


In January of 1647, a mere eight years after the city’s founding, a large vessel set sail for England. The voyage had been necessitated by the colony’s long string of failed attempts to engage in remunerative commerce to the West Indies. As Mather put it, “they found their estates sink so fast, that they must quickly do something.”


Colony Pins Its Hopes on New Vessel

A group of the settlement’s most prominent merchants set to work. They arranged for the construction in Rhode Island of what later chroniclers referred to as a “Great Shippe.” This vessel would carry with it across the Atlantic Ocean every kind of marketable merchandise that could be rounded up in Connecticut. The voyage did not meet with an auspicious start. An especially cold winter necessitated the assistance of an advance crew of ice-chopping local residents just to get the ship out of New Haven Harbor and into Long Island Sound. Even then, the ship needed to be towed backward toward the open water.


Indeed, from one version of the tale to the next, one element is always rendered intact. Viewing the apparently less-than-seaworthy vessel as it embarked, accompanied by a full complement of his parishioners, the Reverend John Davenport is remembered to have spoken prophetically. In direct sight and hearing of the on-board crew and passengers, he is said to have uttered these words in prayer: “Lord, if it be thy pleasure to bury these our Friends in the bottom of the Sea, they are thine; save them!”


The men and women who watched the departure of the ship from the shore saw it slip away unpromisingly into the quickly thickening fog. Months passed and no word of the ship’s arrival in England or sighting of it on the high seas came back to New Haven. With each successive ship that entered New Haven harbor without tidings of the vessel’s whereabouts, the colonists gradually lost hope, sought to cope with their loss and began to pursue other means of making do economically.


An Apparition Appears in the Sky

One and a half years after the ship set sail (some versions of the story suggest that only six months had passed), the ship once again became the focus of speculation. A particularly wild summer thunderstorm hit New Haven harbor, and in its immediate aftermath spectators claimed to have seen a vivid phantom version of the ship sailing in the sky, its masts battered and its sails torn in the violent storm.


The New Haven residents massed along the shore knew at once what had happened. In the spirit of their pastor’s odd “benediction,” they read God’s wrathful judgment into the loss of the vessel—and its spectral return. Had they pinned too much hope on the prospect of commercial success? Had they failed to create the sort of Godly existence in the New World that they had set out to build? The ship never did return, and it took several decades for New Haven to build up its trade and evolve into the bustling New England seaport it eventually became.

About Me

Father, writer, poet, producer, director, actor, singer, guitarist, graphic designer, raconteur, excellent typist, determined, profound speaker, zero-gravity thinker, sage advisor, gruntled, website builder, skeptic, intermittently quixotic, historian, foodie...approaching all endeavors with a bit of Sprezzatura.